Seth Rogen Wants Comedians to Stop Complaining About Cancel Culture

"If you've made a joke that's aged terribly, accept it. And if you don't think it's aged terribly, then say that."
Seth Rogen Wants Comedians to Stop Complaining About Cancel Culture
If we've learned anything about cancel culture at this point, it's that complaining about cancel culture is one of the surest ways to get yourself cancelled. This seems to be something Seth Rogen very much realizes, as the Canadian has shared some pointed views about his fellow comedians' recent complaints about cancel culture.

While out promoting his tome Yearbook, Rogen addressed comments made by the likes of Donald Glover and Chris Rock recently, where they blamed cancel culture for making our content safe and boring.

"There are certain jokes that for sure have not aged well, but I think that's the nature of comedy," Rogen said during a recent Good Morning Britain interview [via Insider/IndieWire]. "I think conceptually those movies are sound, and I think there's a reason they've lasted as far as people still watching and enjoying them today. Jokes are not things that necessarily are built to last."

This then spurred Rogen to take on the whole cancel culture debate a bit more head-on, saying: "To me when I see comedians complaining about this kind of thing, I don't understand what they're complaining about. If you've made a joke that's aged terribly, accept it. And if you don't think it's aged terribly, then say that."

Rogen continued: "To me, it's not worth complaining about to the degree I see other comedians complaining about."

The hosts of Good Morning Britainwho know a thing or two about cancel culture — even asked Rogen if he's tried to clean up his Twitter feed by deleting any old jokes that may be seen a controversial.

Rogen replied: "I was never a comedian that made jokes that were truly designed to target groups that were subjugated in some way. Have we done that without realizing it? Definitely. And those things are in our movies and they're out there, and they're things that I am more than happy to say that they have not aged well.

"But in my Twitter, I've never made a joke that's outwardly horrific in some way, and if you have, I would question why you did that. Saying terrible things is bad, so if you've said something terrible, then it's something you should confront in some way, shape or form. I don't think that's cancel culture. That's you saying something terrible if that's what you've done."

During the same interview, Rogen also told a pretty wild story about meeting Tom Cruise, who pitched him on joining the Church of Scientology.